Aller au contenu


Photo
- - - - -

La presse du jeu vidéo


  • Veuillez vous connecter pour répondre
59 réponses à ce sujet

#1 Ignis

Ignis

    aime les jeux extraterrestres

  • Freelance
  • 5 511 messages

Posté 23/01/2005 - 00:09

Je viens de tomber sur un article de Matthew Sakey, qui reflète comme un miroir ce que je pense de la presse vidéoludique. Bon c'est en anglais, mais lisez vraiment ce texte, je le trouve on ne peut plus pertinent et –ce qui ne gâche rien– très bien écrit :]

Le lien est là : http://www.igda.org/...clash_Jan05.php


Alors, à votre avis ? Quelles solutions s'offrent à la presse papier pour évoluer, pour enfin grandir ?

Image IPB

Gamertags XBLA :
AlterIgnis (JP, principal)
Ignis XII (FR, secondaire)

Id PSN :
Ignis-XII (FR, principal)
Ignis A (HK, secondaire)


#2 Ignis

Ignis

    aime les jeux extraterrestres

  • Freelance
  • 5 511 messages

Posté 23/01/2005 - 19:56

(J'ai un de ces succès moi...) >_<

Image IPB

Gamertags XBLA :
AlterIgnis (JP, principal)
Ignis XII (FR, secondaire)

Id PSN :
Ignis-XII (FR, principal)
Ignis A (HK, secondaire)


#3 Echzechiel

Echzechiel

    PoulpEchiel

  • Membres
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1 218 messages

Posté 23/01/2005 - 20:33

c/c le s'il te plait , je n'arrive pas à le visualiser.
Image IPBImage IPBImage IPB
Même Medion (le gars du jeu hein, pas l'autre usurpateur là) le conseille, venez participer aux encyclopédies Anime/Manga/RPG. :D

#4 Ignis

Ignis

    aime les jeux extraterrestres

  • Freelance
  • 5 511 messages

Posté 23/01/2005 - 20:40

But Seriously, Folks (by Matt Sakey)

The gaming press needs to grow up

Several years ago, when I was young and reckless, I interviewed for the position of Reviews Editor at a major gaming publication. They fed me Goldfish crackers, chatted about games, kicked my ass in an Unreal deathmatch, and then sat down for the Serious Talk. Their final questions for me were about their own magazine – what would I do, they asked, to change it? What about the magazine did I like the least?

Maybe it was the jet lag, but I answered truthfully: “Sometimes I think your magazine acts too childish,” said I. “I could do without the stuffed animals and Godzilla jokes and Nerf gun battle pictorials. I'd rather see more in-depth coverage of gaming trends and the ideas that games produce, and less obsession with technology. If we want games treated as a hobby that's as much for adults as children, then we should act more adult. Fun, but grown-up.” This answer pleased them not, and in retrospect it occurs to me that had I shown a bit more tact – for which I am admittedly not famous – I might have gotten the job.

But the problem persists today. All printed gaming periodicals remain largely fanboy publications: saturated with “no gurls allowed” tree-house humor, sticking almost exclusively to reviews and previews, eliminating any possibility for intellectual discourse by imposing draconian word limits, and discussing games in only the most narrow context. With an 800-word review, it's easy to dash off a rundown of technical merit and overall gameplay, but hard to linger on a more intellectual discussion of how the game experience will affect the player. The press therefore feeds into the unwelcome anti-innovation vibe that haunts gaming, discussing only those things that have been discussed before.

All the reviews of Half-Life 2 that I've read go on and on about the gravity gun, the cool physics, the amazing water effects produced by the Source engine, and how good the level design is. Scarcely a word is mentioned about the potency of the urban dystopia so elegantly realized with City-17; about the brooding, ubiquitous Overwatch and the paranoia it foments; about humanity's growing despondency in the face of the Combine's relentless oppression. Discussion of such emotional impactors is the foundation of reviews in other media, which usually mention such things as technology and special effects only in passing. If our own press can't take seriously the idea that play can be affecting, no one else will.

Instead, it continues the cycle: developers consume the same press gamers do, and presto – the DOOM 3 expansion will have its own “gravity gun,” more physics coolness, and some fancy liquid effects. Doubtless a crateload of upcoming action shooters will do the same. Meanwhile the real power of Half-Life 2 is mentioned and dismissed with a line or two. Indeed, it's the same reason that Half-Life 2 is getting away with having a plotline so nonsensical, so bizarre, so riddled with holes that one wonders what they were on when they wrote it, and where we can get some.

It's time for the gaming press to grow up a little bit. Stop acting like the Nintendo Fun Club and start taking seriously the discipline of game development, and how the products of that discipline can uniquely affect us. The weird irony is that we're seeing websites/blogs take this responsibility and run with it, while print media devolves to little more than delayed advertisements for technical features. Really the web's timeliness and occasional amateurism is more appropriate for quick-turnaround reviews and impressions, while professional print is better suited to more deadline-inspecific meditative content. And yet we see thoughtful musings like this or this or this online, but never in print.

The gaming press shouldn't become ponderous scholarly dissertations on the meaning of the ludic experience. There's a place for that, as there is a place for scholarship in all media, but it's not for mainstream consumption. Rather, the press ought to start reflecting on games-as-experiences, start doing serious editorials, and loosen up a little on the word limits so their writers can say what they want to say. In reviews, grant equal space to rumination on how the game affects the player, what it means, what emotional impact it may have. Of course you can still talk about technology, but for crying out loud, pay as much attention to the game experience as to its normal maps.

It's not like print media is in good shape. It needs to change if it wants to survive, for the simple reason that it's no longer timely. Video killed the radio star; and the web threatens the big gaming magazines, with its discussion community, daily updates, and 24-hour turnaround on reviews. Print is as much as three months behind in some cases, meaning that a lot of their “scoops” have been scooped ages ago online. Right now they're dealing with this problem by focusing more and more on previews of upcoming titles, which is a good idea – but probably not enough. The Scarecrow needs a brain.

The shallow, fanboy press is one of the chief reasons that gaming as an art form remains unaccepted, even within the industry itself. How can developers look at what they do and call it meaningful if their own community doesn't? Perhaps the word “game” is our problem. “Games” are for children. We outgrow them. They're somehow different from movies or novels in this regard; to many, a thirtysomething who expounds delightedly on the joys of a game should feel somewhat abashed; immature at best and infantile at worst. Yet anyone who bothers to actually try one of today's games realizes almost instantly that there's nothing childish about them. Disciples of Salen & Zimmerman realize that games are just methods of communicating and exploring complex ideas. Maybe the press should start treating them as such.

Image IPB

Gamertags XBLA :
AlterIgnis (JP, principal)
Ignis XII (FR, secondaire)

Id PSN :
Ignis-XII (FR, principal)
Ignis A (HK, secondaire)


#5 Did'

Did'

    Il vient du Nord.

  • Membres
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1 081 messages
  • Sexe :Homme
  • Lieu :Nord (59)
  • Jeu actuel :Psychonauts

Posté 23/01/2005 - 21:00

Ben vu mon niveau d'anglais ça va pas le faire la lecture de l'article donc désolé de pas pouvoir réagir (ou alors je passe 1/2 journée dessus avec mon dico XD)^^'

 

#6 CK9

CK9

    Toujours aussi imbuvable

  • Freelance
  • 9 763 messages

Posté 23/01/2005 - 22:23

Je lis ca demain quand je suis moins crevé, même en francais j'aurai la flemme ^^.

sign_364.jpg
sign_374.jpg
sign_283.jpg

"Ah, ma belle pêche…there's no need to tremble like that. Else you'll make me feel like a péché myself."
The English translation for "momo" is "peach". Albedo truly is a cunning linguist.

Note : Pour éviter toute controverse inutile, veuillez ajouter "à mon avis" ou autre "je trouve que" au début de ce post.


#7 Hayward

Hayward

    Français de France

  • Freelance
  • 6 742 messages

Posté 24/01/2005 - 09:57

(J'en ai un peu discuté avec Ignis sur MSN -ou plutôt Y! :p - mais si vous voulez mon avis, je le donnerai plus tard. ^^)

Image IPB
Demain est souvent le jour le plus chargé de la semaine.


#8 Tompouce

Tompouce

    TG Cid

  • Fidèles
  • 2 802 messages

Posté 24/01/2005 - 18:21

article peu pertinant en France je trouve perso parce que aux US d'accord c'est des gros boeufs et ils écrivent comme des gamins de 8ans, en + de cela, la place laissée à la pub est comparative à ce qu'ils ont à la TV ( de la pub partout et tt le tps)... (C est déja bien qu il s'en soit appercu je trouve :lol:
" la vie n'est pas une force pour la violence, mais pour la liberté"

#9 Ignis

Ignis

    aime les jeux extraterrestres

  • Freelance
  • 5 511 messages

Posté 24/01/2005 - 19:24

Hm même en France les tests sont souvent réduits à la portion congrue et trop souvent on voit des "Les graphismes ils sont bien" (1 paragraphe), "Les musiques bah bof" (1 paragraphe), "La jouabilité elle est top" (1 paragraphe) et aainsi de suite, sans réelle valeur ajoutée pour le test. Enfin après c'est mon avis hein, mais bon à trop parler des jeux en tant que produits et pas assez de l'environnement dans lequel ils s'inscrivent je trouve que la focale utilisé par les rédacteurs est trop serrée. Le sommaire d'un mag de JV aujourd'hui c'est quoi ?
News (-> plus trop utiles avec le développement d'Internet)
Previews (-> bon là ok)
Tests (qui s'apparentent plus à de la critique de base sans recul qu'à une réelle réflexion sur le jeu)
Courrier des lecteurs (logique, il en faut bien)


Le reste c'est souvent du bonus :p


Mais perso je trouve que la presse spécialisée française manque de cette maturité qu'on voit dans Edge, GamesTM ou parfois chez NTSC-UK. Regarder un jeu non pas comme un produit mais comme un média culturel. Il manque aujourd'hui un pendant aux Cahiers du cinéma, par exemple, dans le jeu vidéo aujourd'hui.
Si on veut que notre passion soit reconnue au même titre que le cinéma (dont elle se rapproche de plus en plus) comme un média culturel, il faut une presse spécialisée crédible, qui propose davantage qu'un simple catalogue des nouveautés.

Bon après c'est mon avis hein... mais quand j'ai lu ce texte j'ai retrouvé ce que je pense d'un article de jeu vidéo. Un article doit apporter une valeur ajoutée à l'information (comme tout article de journalisme d'ailleurs), il doit donner envie à quelqu'un qui n'est pas vraiment intéressé par le sujet de le lire en entier. Il doit passionner le lecteur, l'attirer, lui proposer autre chose qu'un simple texte calibré et adapté au produit traité. Un journaliste de jeu vidéo ne peut pas se permettre de proposer encore et toujours le même schéma, il doit surprendre le lecteur, l'intéresser.

(Non?)

Image IPB

Gamertags XBLA :
AlterIgnis (JP, principal)
Ignis XII (FR, secondaire)

Id PSN :
Ignis-XII (FR, principal)
Ignis A (HK, secondaire)


#10 Ulfalder

Ulfalder

    True Noob Rune

  • Membres
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2 475 messages

Posté 24/01/2005 - 20:15

Je suis d'accord avec toi Ignis mais le lecteur, veut-il etre surpris lui? :)
Moi aussi, je t'aime Helen...Image IPB

#11 Omega

Omega

    Ally

  • Membres
  • Pip
  • 2 messages

Posté 24/01/2005 - 21:26

Tout à fait d'accord avec toi Ignis!
Les magazines de JV se bornent à décrire le produit en surface (graphisme, jouabilité...), mais derrière ça y a pas grand chose. Le dernier RPG sorti, meilleur que le dernier FF ? Le dernier FPS, meilleur que Half-Life 2 ? Si il y a de meilleur graphisme, une meilleur jouabilité etc... OUI! UNE BOMBE A POSSEDER ABSOLUMENT! (jusqu'a la sortie de la prochaine bombe)
Mais le nouveau JV sorti ne peut-il pas se différencier de la méga-bombe au budget de 10 millions de $ ? Par un thème, un point de vue particulier sur un sujet comme le racisme, les guerres, la façon d'appréhender la mort, les dangers de la science...
J'ai 20 ans, et au niveau JV je ne joue qu'a des RPGs parce que c'est le seul type de JV qui permet le dévelloppement d'une histoire avec un sens, une profondeur et pas les eternelles histoires 1000 fois rabachées (y a des exceptions!). J'ai simplement envie de jeux plus matures et donc d'une presse plus mature également!
J'ai l'impression que la presse considère plus le JV comme un gadget technologique que comme une oeuvre artistique, ou du moins quand celui-ci tente de l'etre.

Bon, pour un premier message c'est un gros coup de gueule, j'espere n'avoir pas été trop saoulant ? :unsure:

#12 Tompouce

Tompouce

    TG Cid

  • Fidèles
  • 2 802 messages

Posté 24/01/2005 - 22:23

Hm même en France les tests sont souvent réduits à la portion congrue et trop souvent on voit des "Les graphismes ils sont bien" (1 paragraphe), "Les musiques bah bof" (1 paragraphe), "La jouabilité elle est top" (1 paragraphe) et aainsi de suite, sans réelle valeur ajoutée pour le test.


Et les tests 20 pages de Jay alors? :)) se disent qu'il serait bien de passer à autre chose. (ce qui rejoint le propos "éclairé de l'américain qui a écrit ce txt)
Maintenant, pour moi, je le répète ils sont largement minoritaires.
" la vie n'est pas une force pour la violence, mais pour la liberté"

#13 destiny

destiny

    Newbie et fier de l'être

  • Fidèles
  • 1 563 messages

Posté 25/01/2005 - 12:58

Hm même en France les tests sont souvent réduits à la portion congrue et trop souvent on voit des "Les graphismes ils sont bien" (1 paragraphe), "Les musiques bah bof" (1 paragraphe), "La jouabilité elle est top" (1 paragraphe) et aainsi de suite, sans réelle valeur ajoutée pour le test.


C'est caricaturale !
On peut largement offrir cette fameuse valeur ajoutée sans pour autant s’écarter d’un schéma classique, limite universel.
Pour ma part, je n'ai jamais été vraiment intéressé par la rubrique test de quelque magazine que ce soit (et quelque soit l'époque). Néanmoins, si c’est pour retrouver un test avec moult interprétations (souvent bancales) ou bien la fameuse référence à la psychologie des personnages, je préfère encore un test austère, mécanique.

Un test n'est pas une thèse. Il doit permettre au lecteur de répondre à une question existentielle : "J'achète ou pas ?"
Toute information superflue porte atteinte à cet objectif.

Positionnons nous dans du concret.
J'attends que le testeur du futur Castlevania (j'ai cet exemple en tête vu que je viens de passer sur le topic le concernant) soit capable de restituer l'historique de la saga sans bévue. Au moins qu'il connaisse l’origine de cette dernière (ce qui déjà est énorme car je n'ai pas le souvenir d'un test professionnel sans erreurs de ce côté ci).
J'attends une somme de connaissance importante. Passé le côté historique, j’attends des informations sur l’équipe de développement, le projet du staff, son dernier titre...

Bref, tout ces détails me permettent juste d'évaluer la « légitimité » du testeur (et par conséquent la qualité du test). Si la somme d’informations contenue dans le test me permet de répondre à la question « j’achète ou pas ? », je le considérerais comme bon, quelque soit la forme de ce dernier (avec bien entendu, un niveau de français décent). Si en plus j'ai le droit à quelques phrases comiques, alors là, je suis aux anges (oui Kabuki, Rakugaki, c'est vous les plus beaux !).

Je préfère de loin un test basé sur cette structure plutôt que de la prose narrant le caractère artistique du soft. Ou encore un paragraphe sur les impressions du testeurs à la vue de telle ou telle scène…qui lui aurait rappelé, telle la madeleine de Proust, ses vacances passées à la montagne en 1978.

Image IPB

#14 Ignis

Ignis

    aime les jeux extraterrestres

  • Freelance
  • 5 511 messages

Posté 25/01/2005 - 13:33

Tom ->> voui mais la population des joueurs vieillit depuis de nombreuses années. Alors oui, la presse spécialisée actuelle s'adresse surtout aux jeunes, mais l'apparition d'un titre plus adulte ne serait pas pour me déplaire. Certes il ne conviendrait sans doute pas au public actuel des magazines, mais je pense qu'il créerait une nouvelle niche, notamment parmi les 20-35 ans.

Dest ->> Tu dis toi même que tu n'es pas trop intéressé par les tests. C'est justement ce point que j'entendais faire remarquer. Je pense qu'un test doit avoir suffisamment de valeur littéraire pour pouvoir susciter l'intérêt de lecteurs qui se contrefichent de ce jeu. Jamais je n'ai parlé de psychologie des personnages (à la base un test s'adresse quand même à ceux qui n'ont pas fait le jeu, donc un développement psychologique serait un peu spoilant :p).

Je parle avant tout en termes de qualité d'écriture et d'originalité du style. Déjà –et je considère ça comme une aberration– une énorme majorité de critiques de jeux n'ont pas de titre. Comme si un jeu était un produit lambda passé au banc d'essai à la chaîne... Non et non, je le regrette et je le répète, un test sérieux se doit de susciter l'intérêt du lecteur.

Quant à ton point de vue sur l'historique d'une série (puisque les suites de suites se multiplient), je suis parfaitement d'accord : le journaliste doit maîtriser son sujet. MAIS cela ne veut pas dire pour autant qu'il mette dans son test TOUTES les informations dont il dispose. Il faut que ce background serve sa critique, et non qu'il l'envahisse chaotiquement. Admettons que dans un test de Castlevania Harmony of Dissonance tu lises tout l'historique de la série, ses créateurs, etc... Tu crois sincèrement que tu aimerais relire tous ces trucs dans le test du suivant ? Moi pas...
Quant à la légitimité du testeur, c'est une autre question. Je ne sais pas si Einstein aurait fait un bon prof de physique ou si Milton Friedman ferait un super prof d'économie... Pourtant ils sont plus que calés dans leur domaine... Mais il y a une différence entre savoir et transmettre. Certains sont merveilleusement doués dans leur discipline mais incapable d'expliquer clairement les bases. A l'inverse, d'autres n'atteindront jamais des sommets de savoir mais sauront en gros de quoi ils parlent et se révèleront meilleurs pédagogues. C'est aussi le cas pour le journalisme. Un gars hyper calé en consoles old-school pour qui les aucun shoot 2D n'est inconnu, qui a en tête tout le catalogue des consoles entre 1985 et 2000 ne sera jamais aussi "légitime" pour écrire un article qu'un autre qui, certes, n'est pas aussi calé, mais connaît à peu près son sujet, a une conscience journalistique (donc n'écrira pas n'importe quoi), des bases d'écriture solides et un bon sens didactique.


Donc tester un journaliste sur des connaissances pointues, je ne sais pas si c'est nécessairement le bon critère. Même si le journaliste en question doit être à même d'acquérir les connaissances nécessaires (et uniquement nécessaires) et plus simplement de ne pas écrire de co**erie.

Quant à la question du "j'achète ou pas", je ne la formulerais pas vraiment comme ça (sinon tu réduis le jeu vidéo au même niveau qu'une friteuse-cuiseuse ou une tondeuse à gazon, en un mot : un PRODUIT). La question serait plutôt "est-ce que ce jeu vidéo, après avoir lu le test, m'intéresse ?". Et après en fonction de tes moyens et de ta patience, tu l'achètes maintenant, plus tard ou pas du tout.

Les tests tels qu'ils existent aujourd'hui ne sont pas à remettre en cause. Dans le cinéma on a bien des magazines comme Ciné Live, qui en une demi-page font une critique de base d'un film, alors qu'à côté tu as les Cahiers du cinéma (par exemple hein, il y en a d'autres bien sur) qui proposent non pas une simple critique du film mais aussi des développements sur tout ce qui l'entoure. Ce genre de magazine manque aujourd'hui au jeu vidéo.

Image IPB

Gamertags XBLA :
AlterIgnis (JP, principal)
Ignis XII (FR, secondaire)

Id PSN :
Ignis-XII (FR, principal)
Ignis A (HK, secondaire)


#15 destiny

destiny

    Newbie et fier de l'être

  • Fidèles
  • 1 563 messages

Posté 25/01/2005 - 14:02

Ah je comprends.
En fait, je ne voyais pas trop ce que tu entendais par la notion de valeur ajoutée.
Maintenant, j'ai cerné le problème. Je suis donc pleinement de ton avis.

Un test doit être doté d’un style particulier et s’éloigner du moule "rédaction de collège" trop présent dans la presse.
Comme tu le dis, le niveau de connaissance doit servir le test et non l'alimenter. En pratique, il est évident qu’un test portant sur un historique passe à coté de son objectif (que tu as mieux formulé que moi, avec la question « Est-ce que ce jeu vidéo, après avoir lu le test, m'intéresse ?").
La description de la qualité de l'univers, l'ambiance...constituent un intérêt majeur (dont l'importance va en grandissant) il faut donc que les tests suivent cette évolution car sinon, ils passent à côté d'une partie de l'intérêt du soft.
Il est un fait que l’on ne peut tester Metal Gear sur MSX de la même manière (avec le même schéma argumentatif) que le dernier opus sur PS2.

En ce qui concerne la légitimité du testeur, je partais du principe que ce dernier avait un niveau de français décent. Qu’il fut donc potentiellement capable d’écrire correctement, à défaut de produire un travail rigoureux et qui mérite que l’on y accorde de l’intérêt.
(Même très bien écrit, je n’accorderais aucun crédit au test d’un fin lettré ayant touché à son premier jeu la veille, de la même manière que le pigiste qui pond un dossier de 10 pages sur une console qu’il n’a jamais touché).
je souligne l’évidence des tes propos et de ton analyse. Bref, c'est du Ignis. :yes:

Image IPB




0 utilisateur(s) li(sen)t ce sujet

0 membre(s), 0 invité(s) et 0 utilisateur(s) anonyme(s)